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Freight Tec News

Moved: 3 Komatsu HD 785-7

Here are some pictures from a recent move of 3 Komatsu HD 785-7 Off Highway Rock Trucks.  These weighed in at a massive 165,000 lbs, 35′ L x 22’6″ W x 18’6″ H on the ground. The trucks were split – removing the beds and outside tires.  Chassis shipped at 30′ L x 18′ W x 15′ H at 100,000 lbs, while the beds shipped at 28′ L x 22’6″ W x 16′ H at 65,000 lbs.

Have pictures of a recent move you’re proud of? Drop us a comment or contact us!











Highway Bill, and what it means for You

Congress approved the Highway Bill, and President Obama is set to sign it on Friday, July 6, 2012. The report contains the TIA-OOIDA-ATA compromise language almost exactly.

How will this affect you?

Read the great blog post and summary from DAT.com.

Leave a comment below and let us know what you think!

Driving Truck and Getting Back Home to Family

One of the very top values at Freight Tec is Family.

We believe in trying to find a different load for a Carrier, who wants to be home for the weekend to spend time with his family…  Taking care of some of the extra headaches for a Shipping Manager so he can spend more time with his family… or making sure our Agents and Employees get the time they need to spend with their own families. We consider each of these part of the our Freight Tec Family as well.

This article – Myths about the Trucking Industry – is about Truck Drivers in general, and it really struck a chord with me as I read it this morning.

Quoted from the article:

“Next time you see a semi-truck on the road, think about the driver behind the wheel, and realize he—or she—is a person just like you, working toward a goal, delivering goods you depend on, and looking forward to getting back home to family.”

If you get a chance, be sure to thank a Truck Driver – and at the very least, respect what they do and the part they play in keeping this country rolling.

Are you an Agent or Broker interested in joining the Freight Tec Family?

 

Ban On Cell Phone Use While Driving Hits Commercial Drivers

Well, it’s official.  Effective January 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and others implemented a rule banning the use of cell phones while driving for all commercial truck drivers.

Violations can be severe – up to $2,750 fine for each offense and possible commercial license suspension for multiple violations.  It’s not just the drivers either – companies that allow their drivers to use cell phones while driving could be hit with fines up to $11,000.

While this restriction will undoubtedly affect many carriers, Freight Tec strongly supports the FMCSA in this decision with the ultimate objective in keeping our public roads safer.

Watch for Red-Flags and Avoid Cargo Theft

The FBI estimates the loss value of Cargo Theft at roughly $30 Billion dollars a year.  Don’t think that effects you as an every-day consumer?  Think again.  That $30 Billion loss causes retail business everywhere to mark-up their products an additional 20% for consumers!  … And that’s on items you buy everyday!  Electronics, food and clothing were the top three commodities stolen in 2010. 
(National Insurance Crime Bureau)

According to the NICB’s report, most Cargo Thefts happen within 200 miles or four (4) hours from the driver’s starting point.  Criminals view Cargo Theft as relatively ‘low risk’ and usually produces a ‘high return’ for them when they turn around and sell the product they’ve stolen.  Criminals follow drivers they’ve targeted and can usually steal the cargo within five (5) minutes after the driver stops.  That is scary!  Another growing trend is ‘Fraudulent Pickups’ where thieves access load information online and impersonate a legitimate carrier to pick up a load directly from the shipper… and after they’ve picked up the load, they disappear.

Ways to Prevent Cargo Theft:

  • Run Background Checks and Screen Employees.
  • Train Employees and Educate them on hijack awareness and prevention.
  • Consider In-Transit Security when choosing shipment routes and avoid stopping again within 200 miles (or four hours) after picking up a load. As well, use secured lots and avoid parking in theft hotspots.
  • Conduct periodic supply chain audits to discover gaps in shipment protection.

Let’s work together to keep the cargo we haul safe from criminals and thieves.

Have comments or more ways to prevent Cargo Theft?  Leave us a comment!

EOBRs can Reduce Violation Fines

We love staying up-to-date and reading the Journal of Commerce – Trucking.  Last week an excellent post really got us thinking.  EOBRs can SIGNIFICANTLY reduce violation fines.

You can read the full article here: FMCSA Orders Trucker to Install 700 EOBRs

Basically, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) ordered JBS Carriers Inc., of Greeley, Colorado, to install Electronic Onboard Recorders (EOBRs) in it’s 700 trucks by March 2011.  This came about because of many hours-of-service and CDL violations.  Their choice was to take on a $81,780 fine or install EOBRs and take a reduce fine of $16,000. 

With that much in fines, installing the EOBRs seems like a no-brainer.  No question they will help this company reduce it’s future violations significantly, and make them a better carrier in the process.

With upcoming changes regarding CSA 2010, we all should be looking at ways to reduce our violations and become better, stronger transportation providers.  

Be sure to also read our article on CSA 2010 Opinions – The Good and the Bad.

CSA 2010 Opinions – The Good and the Bad

Our position in the industry allows us to hear opinions from highly qualified and reputable people about CSA 2010Both the good and the bad

Here’s a brief list of the top 3 opinions we’re hearing –

First, the Good:

  • CSA 2010 is a much better product today than it was a year ago.  Many modifications have been made after extensive work and feedback from states and carriers testing it out.
  • Every violation in detail is now brought to your attention and scored – unlike the old SAFER system.
  • Seeing deficiencies are shocking at first, but you need to view them as an indicator of the need for changes in behavior – take advantage of the information provided and use it to improve.

Second, the Bad:

  • Even no-fault or non-preventable accidents will get count against your score.
  • Some think severe points should not be accessed to certain aspects that would in no way contribute to the cause of an accident.  As it stands now, you can get written up and have points added to your score because of minor infractions.
  • CSA 2010 is turning out to be CSA 2011 … or some speculate even later before it is fully implemented.  Many people (on a state level) need to be trained – Highway Patrol, Inspectors, local FMCSA personnel, etc.  This may end up as the new “CSA” system and drop the 2010 reference altogether.

We welcome your thoughts and opinions as well –
What have you heard or what do you know about CSA 2010?

Leave us a comment and let us know!